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Director Josh Boone Explains Why The Stand Has Stalled

Published on March 25th, 2016 | Updated on March 25th, 2016 | By FanFest

Director Josh Boone
Explains Why The Stand Has
Stalled

The Stand, Stephen
King’s epic tale of a post-

apocalyptic battle between good and evil has had a feature film in the works
for
some time now. Fault
in Our Stars
Director, Josh Boone, has had a
script, King’s blessing
and a cast in place for a while
now – so what’s the
hold up? Why is The Stand,
stationary?

In a recent interview
with
Nightmare Magazine, he gets fairly candid on the hold

up:

 

The reason The Stand
hasn’t been made yet is
because it’s expensive. It’s a problem of
perception, I think. We really are

attempting to revive the idea of the elevated horror film—movies like The

Exorcist, Rosemary’s Baby, The
Shining—A-list films with A-list casts. The 1980s
really killed this idea
because studios realized you could
make horror films for
dirt cheap and make a killing.

In theory, every
studio wants to make The

Stand. It’s a bona fide American classic. It should be an event movie. A
big,
serious-minded epic with an
awe-inspiring cast that is as faithful as possible
to King’s narrative and
intentions. This should be The
Godfather of post-
apocalyptic epics. I adapted the book and have King’s
blessing. We got that awe-

inspiring cast. But WB didn’t want to spend what it would actually cost to
make
the movie. To have a real
conversation about making this film at a level that is
appropriate for the
book King wrote is an 85-to-100-
million-dollar conversation,
which from where I’m sitting sounds like a no-
brainer considering the mind-

numbing nonsense that studios spend 250 million on. Which brings me back to
that
perception problem. They
look at The Stand and wonder why they can’t make this
post-apocalyptic
horror movie for 35 million. King and
I were most excited and
continue to be most excited about a single three
hour event movie: The Godfather

of post-apocalyptic movies.

Source: Nightmare
Magazine

 

Back in 1994,
The Stand got the
mini-series treatment, with a 3-
night event playing
out on primetime television. If you have taken on the
task of reading this
behemoth
novel, you know that primetime is not the right place for it. It’s
dark and
twisted, and in order to capture
the spirit and feel of the story, a
big screen feature film is the way to
go.

Boone’s comments in the

interview about his vision for the film have me truly excited for it all to
come
to fruition. While I am
a purist in the idea of transferring a novel to a film,
especially a King
novel, I am very intrigued by what
he has in mind. Boone plans
on fitting more than a thousands pages into
three hours, and his plan of attack?

By “shattering King’s structure and telling the story non-

linear.”

 

That was
really what broke everything open
for me. The opening scene is Mother
Abagail on her deathbed sending our
heroes
off to make their stand against the Dark Man in Vegas and then we
jump back in
time and you
basically have three spinning timelines going the whole movie—
Captain Trips,
Boulder, and The Stand, same as
the book, but they are all
happening
simultaneously.

 

For all the talk about

how the story will be told, there is a big lack of talk on who will be on
film
telling the story. As a
Constant Reader of many years, and a huge fan of this
book, I have my own
ideas who should play the handful
of main players. Since I
sadly have no say in the matter, I am beyond
curious to know who Boone and

company plan on for Stu Redman, Frannie Goldsmith, Mother Abigail, Larry

Underwood and Nick Andros;
that’s just to name a few.

The only name I
have seen attached to the
film is Matthew McConaughey as the
Dark Man
(aka Randy Flagg).
Since talk of his playing the same
character in
another current King flick, The Dark Tower, has been
confirmed, I would
happily
take him as Flagg. I can only hope and pray that they take make
similarly
good choices for the remaining
characters.

Boone goes on to say
that the film, while probably still
several years away, is still in
the works.
As soon as a studio comes along that’s willing to invest what’s
necessary to
do it right,
the ball will get rolling. I, for one, cannot wait. I’m ready to
survive
Captain Trips and take the long
road to Boulder again with my friends
Stu, Larry and Frannie.

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