LFF 2019 Review: ‘I Lost My Body’

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Netflix

LFF 2019: I Lost My Body is a French film featuring in the ‘Dare’ strand of the 2019 festival.

A boy searches for a lost connection with a woman. A hand searches for it’s body.

I Lost My Body is a gentle film that meditates on connections, lost chances and things that can’t be replaced.

In one part of Paris, a hand comes alive, separated from it’s body, and starts on an adventure to be reunited. Elsewhere, Naoufel makes a brief connection through an intercom, and sets out to find the body attached to the voice.

The storyline following Naoufel and Gabrielle follows a traditional but endearing path. Naoufel is alone, still recovering from the loss of his parents as a child, and his nerves get the better of him. Instead of introducing himself to Gabrielle in person, he follows her. He ends up at her Uncle’s woodshop and by accident becomes his apprentice, gaining her trust, and new skills.

There are some beautiful themes throughout, especially that of the North Pole, snow and the joy of isolation. Naoufel, Gabrielle and the hand search for this calm and peace, but also strive to make connections within this isolation.

The hand’s storyline is just as emotional. Despite being a hand, the limb is able to emote through the power of animation. We see it’s slow journey through alleys, homes, ice and rooftops with some beautiful surreal set pieces including a classic piano serenade and a trip through space.

It’s not your typical tale, but it’s story of loss and making connections through loss will resonate with audiences. It reminds the viewer the importance of small sensations, as well as the power of touch and memory. It also reminds us that once severed, some ties are forever broken.

An uplifting animation sure to touch lonely hearts.

Running as part of the ‘Dare’ strand at this year’s London Film Festival, you can find more information about the film and tickets at the BFI Website. Can’t make it to the festival? It’ll be available on Netflix in the UK and Ireland later on in 2019.

A severed hand searches for its owner in this striking animation, which grabbed the Grand Prize at the Cannes Critics’ Week.

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