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‘FaceOff’ Recap ‘Foreign Bodies’

FACE OFF -- 

"Foreign Bodies" Episode 1005 -- Pictured: Lance Henriksen -- 
(Photo 
by: Jordin Althaus/Syfy)
FACE OFF — “Foreign
Bodies” Episode 1005 —
Pictured: Lance Henriksen —
(Photo by: Jordin
Althaus/Syfy)
FACE OFF -- 
"Foreign Bodies" Episode 1005 -- 
Pictured: (l-r) Rob Seal, Kaleb 
Lewis 
-- (Photo by: Jordin Althaus/Syfy)
FACE OFF -- 
"Foreign Bodies" Episode 1005 -- 
Pictured: Robert Lindsay -- 
(Photo by: Jordin Althaus/Syfy)
FACE OFF — “Foreign Bodies” Episode 1005 —
Pictured:
Robert Lindsay —
(Photo by: Jordin Althaus/Syfy)

Some things
aren’t made in
a lab; they’re
discovered.

The artists became space
scientists and were thrust into
the universe of science fiction
horror inspired
by classic films like Alien and The Thing. Lance Henrikson,
Bishop the android
from
Aliens, joined host, McKenzie Westmore to introduce the contestants to this

other worldly challenge. In self-
chosen teams of two, the artists were directed
to microscopes that revealed
real parasitic microorganisms
that were the
creative germs for baring invading alien life forms that use
human bodies as an
incubating
host.

Just as the artists were beginning to develop their
designs,
McKenzie and Lance returned to add
a twist: they had 2 hours to create
the amniotic slime that surrounds their
bursting creatures. Most of the
artists
had never created slime before and had fun with textures, colors,
and booger-ish
materials, all
going for that stretchy, phlegm-like consistency. Mel partnered
with Melissa
and their winning goo earned
them both immunity for this
challenge.

Team Walter and Johnny created
a raw, bloody design that

combined both transformation and chest burster. Their organism was animated

using a drill motor and blood
effects. Though the judges gave the team cred for
creativity, ultimately
they had concerns that the cowl
simply seemed like it was
sitting on the model’s head. They were judged as
“safe” and were allowed to

return to the workroom.

Mel and Melissa really didn’t need their
earned
immunity, as the judges
were impressed with their blue-green alien that caused
their lab assistant
model to shed her scalp and face.
Alien labial folds were
outfitted with human teeth. They were voted into
“top looks.”

Anna paired

with Yvonne to create a bifurcated alien infection. Half of their model
remained
human and the other half
was inspired by their microorganism. The judges were
critical of the even
split down the middle of the face,
calling this a design
rule breaker. They called the work “contrived and
boring” and this team was
voted
into “bottom looks.”

Team Kaleb and Rob took Lance’s advice to

incorporate anticipation into the
reveal process. They chose to have their alien
burst from the back of the
model’s head and body so that only
upon turning
around would the audience see the invading organism. Rob
designed a clever cowl
that
included a serpent like form slithering underneath the skin. The duo was

voted into “top looks.”

Katie
and Robert conceived that their alien
infection would result in multiple
growing tumors on the host’s body
that would
erupt with the alien life form. The judges criticized the design
as looking more
like lumps
and bumps instead of tumors and stated that the overall paint job was
not
congruent between the model’s
actual skin and the appliance. The cowl was so
heavy that it slipped down
the models forehead causing a huge,
visible edge.
Glenn said the seam was “the worst ever seen on Face Off.”
They were voted into
“bottom
looks.”

Rob, for the second week in a row, was ranked the

winner.

Katie was sent home, taking
the blame for the multi-problematic
cowl.

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David Schoelen

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David M. Schoelen, LCSW, is a legit fandom nerd, founder of Reel Guise Cosplay, and FX makeup dude. His writing has appeared in both print and electronic media including the San Diego Comic Con International souvenir book and The Walking Dead fan sites. He focuses his pop culture exploration on the underlying psychology of character and story.